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FezCNC

Reply #260 — Posted 4yr ago
by Brett | Superhuman | 125,064 exp
Reply #260 — Posted 4yr ago
by Brett | Superhuman | 125,064 exp
I'm not sure what mini you're talking about - that's a Rhino and Wiz811 module that I can see
Reply #261 — Posted 4yr ago
by mhectorgato | King | 37,168 exp
Reply #261 — Posted 4yr ago
by mhectorgato | King | 37,168 exp
Brett says:
I'm not sure what mini you're talking about - that's a Rhino and Wiz811 module that I can see

Oh ok ... I thought that the module was the mini and the Rhino was some dev board for a DIP40.
Reply #262 — Posted 4yr ago
by NielsNL2 | Junior | 596 exp
Reply #262 — Posted 4yr ago
by NielsNL2 | Junior | 596 exp
@kurtnelle: Sorry to bring this tread alive again.
But wauw, i'm not the only one building a CNC machine.
Yours look very cool. I just found out the tread earlier today. And i have looked all your pics and videos.
My own CNC will be much much smaller The frame is 30x30 cm and the work space is now, i think not more then 15 to 20 cm.
I was wondering would you mind sharing your code with me?
Not sure of you ever build the G-code parser as reading your other tread. But that is what i'm searching for, and the linear and arc based movement control.

Anyway i hope you enjoy building it as much as i do. Wink
Reply #263 — Posted 4yr ago
by Unknown | Hero | 10,958 exp
Reply #263 — Posted 4yr ago
by Unknown | Hero | 10,958 exp
@NielsNL2 (are you from the netherlands?) No problem with the tread, we often do that around here. I'm actually still writing that G-Code parser for a newer machine (see pic), and the problem that I've been having is for arc based movement control. I've been working on nothing but that for a solid week now and it has been a daunting task.

Linear is straight forward, however arcs are not. The technique that the industry seems to use it to create a motion profile based on trapezoidal profiles which create the arc as a series of short lines that flow one into the other without having the end effector pause between lines.

http://support.motioneng.com/Software-MPI_04_02/Topics/Geometric%20Path%20Motion.htm
http://www.isa.org/Content/ContentGroups/Motion_Control2/Features1/200222/May_June/200206Axes.pdf

The two links above describe the problem (so that you get an idea of the difficulty).

I am using the dSPIN stepper drivers are you may have read which offloads the stepper motion to the integrated co processor.
Reply #264 — Posted 4yr ago
by NielsNL2 | Junior | 596 exp
Reply #264 — Posted 4yr ago
by NielsNL2 | Junior | 596 exp
Oww that new own does look very nice. Will it be also be able to be used as a 3D printer?

I'm not sure why the arc function does not be that easy for you? When i look at the code used by GBRL then it looks very simple to do.

void mc_arc(double theta, double angular_travel, double radius, double linear_travel, int axis_1, int axis_2, 
  int axis_linear, double feed_rate, int invert_feed_rate, double *position)
{      
  int acceleration_manager_was_enabled = plan_is_acceleration_manager_enabled();
  plan_set_acceleration_manager_enabled(false); // disable acceleration management for the duration of the arc
  double millimeters_of_travel = hypot(angular_travel*radius, labs(linear_travel));
  if (millimeters_of_travel == 0.0) { return; }
  uint16_t segments = round(millimeters_of_travel/settings.mm_per_arc_segment);
  // Multiply inverse feed_rate to compensate for the fact that this movement is approximated
  // by a number of discrete segments. The inverse feed_rate should be correct for the sum of 
  // all segments.
  if (invert_feed_rate) { feed_rate *= segments; }
  // The angular motion for each segment
  double theta_per_segment = angular_travel/segments;
  // The linear motion for each segment
  double linear_per_segment = linear_travel/segments;
  // Compute the center of this circle
  double center_x = position[axis_1]-sin(theta)*radius;
  double center_y = position[axis_2]-cos(theta)*radius;
  // a vector to track the end point of each segment
  double target[3];
  int i;
  // Initialize the linear axis
  target[axis_linear] = position[axis_linear];
  for (i=0; i<segments; i++) {
    target[axis_linear] += linear_per_segment;
    theta += theta_per_segment;
    target[axis_1] = center_x+sin(theta)*radius;
    target[axis_2] = center_y+cos(theta)*radius;
    plan_buffer_line(target[X_AXIS], target[Y_AXIS], target[Z_AXIS], feed_rate, invert_feed_rate);
  }
  plan_set_acceleration_manager_enabled(acceleration_manager_was_enabled);
}
Reply #265 — Posted 4yr ago
by Unknown | Hero | 10,958 exp
Reply #265 — Posted 4yr ago
by Unknown | Hero | 10,958 exp
Yes, I keep seeing that approximation technique all over the place, however I'm convinced that there is a way to do it by controlling the acceleration of the axes.

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